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PARENT UPDATE OCT 7, 2020 Call_To_Action_Arch of NY_Brooklyn_Queens_10_06_20

THE FLU A Guide For Parents

The Flu: A Guide for Parents

Keep your kids safe. Get their flu vaccine every year.

Is the flu more serious for kids? Infants and young children are at greater risk for getting seriously ill from the flu. That’s why the New York State Department of Health recommends that  all children 6 months and older get the flu vaccine.
Flu vaccine may save your child’s life. Most people with the flu are sick for about a week, and then they feel   better. But, some people, especially young children, pregnant women, older people, and people with chronic health problems can get very sick. Some  can even die. An annual vaccine is the best way to protect your child from the flu. The vaccine is recommended for everyone 6 months and older   every year.
What is the flu? The flu, or influenza, is an infection of the nose, throat, and lungs. The flu can spread from person to person.
Who needs the flu vaccine? •   Flu vaccine can be given to children 6 months and older.

•   Children younger than 9 years old who get a vaccine for the first time need two doses.

How else can I protect my child? •   Get the flu vaccine for yourself.

•   Encourage your child’s close contacts to get the flu vaccine, too. This is very important if your child is younger than 5, or if he or she has a chronic health problem such as asthma (breathing disease) or diabetes (high blood sugar levels). Because children under 6 months can’t be vaccinated, they rely on those around them to get an annual flu vaccine.

•   Wash  your hands often and cover your coughs  and sneezes.  It’s  best to use a tissue and quickly throw it away. If you don’t have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your upper sleeve, not your hands. This will prevent the spread of germs.

•   Tell your children to:

•   Stay away from people who are sick;

•   Clean their hands often;

•   Keep their hands away from their face; and

•   Cover coughs and sneezes to protect others.

What are signs of

the flu?

The flu comes on suddenly. Most people with the flu feel very tired and have a high fever, headache, dry cough, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, and    sore muscles. Some people, especially children, may also have stomach problems and diarrhea. The cough can last two or more weeks.

 

How does the flu spread? People who have the flu usually cough, sneeze, and have a runny nose.  The droplets in a cough, sneeze or runny nose contain the flu virus. Other people can get the flu by breathing in these droplets or by getting them in their nose or mouth.
How long can a sick person spread the flu to others? Most healthy adults may be able to spread the flu from one day before getting sick to up to 5 days after  getting  sick.  This  can  be  longer  in children and in people who don’t fight disease as well (people with weaker immune systems).
What should I use to

clean hands?

Wash your children’s hands with soap and water. Wash them for as long as it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice. If soap and water are not handy, use a hand sanitizer. It should be rubbed into hands until the hands are dry.
What can I do if my child gets sick? •   Make sure your child gets plenty of rest and drinks lots of fluids.

•   Talk with your child’s health care provider before giving your child over-the-counter medicine.

•   Never give your child or teen aspirin, or medicine that has aspirin in it. It can cause serious problems.

•   Call your child’s health care provider if your child develops flu symptoms and is younger than 5 or has a chronic medical condition like asthma, diabetes, or heart or lung disease.

•   If you are worried about your child’s illness, call your health care provider.

Can my child go to school or day care

with the flu?

No. If your child has the flu, he or she should stay home to rest. This helps avoid giving the flu to other children.
When can my child go back to school or

day care after having the flu?

Children with the flu should be isolated in the home, away from other  people. They should also stay home until they have no fever without the use of fever-control medicines and they feel well for 24 hours. Remind your child to protect others by covering his or her mouth when coughing or sneezing. You may want to send your child to school with some tissues, and a hand sanitizer, if allowed by the school.

For more information about the flu, visit health.ny.gov/flu Or, www.cdc.gov/flu

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Department of Health

Follow us on:    Facebook/NYSDOH

Twitter/HealthNYgov

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Protocols From Diocese for when a Student is Ill

NUT SENSITIVE SCHOOL POLICY UPDATE

Dear Visitation Academy Parents,

Protecting a student from exposure to offending allergens is the most important way to prevent life‐threatening anaphylaxis. Avoidance of exposure to allergens is the key to preventing a reaction.

The classroom environment is a place where students need to feel safe to promote learning. This issue is especially important to the parent/guardian of an allergic student. Safeguards and any required accommodations to meet the specific needs of each student with a food allergy are in place and we need all families to assist with in helping to protect the health of every child attending Visitation.

Protecting a student from exposure to offending allergens is the most important way to prevent life‐threatening anaphylaxis. Avoidance of exposure to allergens is the key to preventing a reaction.

School is a high‐risk setting for exposure to food allergens, due to such factors as the large number of students, increased exposure of the allergic student to food allergens, as well as cross‐contamination.

All students with health issues that may impact the school day have necessary medication and we want to ensure environmental protocols are followed for the health and safety of every child.

PEANUT AND TREE NUT SENSITIVE POLICY

As a school dedicated to elementary education, we know that it is essential that we help our students manage their allergies. While the faculty and staff do an amazing job of cleaning and wiping down surfaces, there are some children within our school who could have a serious allergic reaction from contact with even a microscopic amount of the offending foods.

In order to protect all Visitation students, our school a Peanut/Tree Nut Sensitive School. We ask that no peanuts or tree nuts be brought into our school. Foods sent in for snack or lunch should be carefully checked to make sure they are peanut/tree nut-free. This means the product cannot contain

peanuts and tree nuts and cannot have the following warnings: “may contain…”; “processed in a facility…”, and “manufactured on shared equipment…” Families can help ensure that our school stays peanut/tree nut-free by reading packaging labels and by reminding children not to share food with other children at school. We need to make sure that there is little opportunity for a child to be exposed to foods that could harm her.

Nut-sensitive Policy:

To create the safest, healthiest, and most inclusive environment for all students, the school has implemented a nut-sensitive policy, which states that we will attempt to maintain an environment free of all peanuts and tree nuts. (Tree nuts include nuts such as cashews, almonds, pecans, walnuts, pistachios.) Foods containing these items should not be brought to school for snack or lunch.

We are an allergy-aware school. As such, we seek to build community sensitivity and empower all students. Students with allergies are aware of what they can and cannot eat, and we ask that other students and adults are conscientious of the allergies of others.

Thank you for your cooperation with this matter.

Jean Bernieri

Adapted from: foodallergy.org

PARENT UPDATE Sept23

MRS. BERNIERI WELCOME 2020

Mother Susan welcome 2020

PARENT UPDATE Sept 11, 2020

PARENT UPDATE Sept 8, 2020

VA OPENING GUIDING PRINCIPALS 8.18.2020

N-PK End of Summer Plans

K-1 End of Summer Plans

Gr. 2-3 End of Summer Plans

Gr. 4-5 End of Summer Plans (1)

REOPENING PLAN UPDATE: ORIENTATION, ARRIVAL TIMES

VISITATION ACADEMY REOPENING PLAN

REOPENING PLAN UPDATE 8.7.2020

VISITATION REOPENING PLAN 7.27.2020

NYS SCHOOL HEALTH EXAM FORM PREK, K, I, 3, 5, 7

WELCOME LETTER 2020-2021 SCHOOL YEAR

PARENT UPDATE DATE RETURN TO SCHOOL EXPECTATIONS 7.7.2020

NYSSchoolHealthExamForm

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PEANUT, TREE NUT ALLERGEN SENSITIVE SCHOOL

ATHLETIC CODE OF CONDUCT

CONCUSSION STATEMENT